Cue the waterworks.

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Today’s Word of the Day is mawkish which means, “exaggeratedly or childishly emotional.” I think we’ve all seen someone just go OTT in their reaction to something, and I don’t mean just children. I don’t blame kids for acting a fool when they’re upset, they’re kids. That’s the only time in life aside from maybe widowhood when you can throw yourself to the ground, kicking and screaming and crying, and not have a bunch of people standing around telling you to knock that shit off. I’m uncomfortable when I’m around people who are that demonstratively upset. It’s so ridiculous, it makes me embarrassed for them. Again, I’m not talking about situations where someone has died. If someone I loved died, I wouldn’t be responsible for my actions. I’m talking about people who react to any bad news or disappointment with wailing like a baby with a loaded diaper. That is what makes me uncomfortable. Maybe it’s because I’ve always played my emotions close to the vest and don’t really show how I’m feeling if I’m sad/upset, but I don’t like making a spectacle of myself and can’t understand how other people can do it.

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It’s a free-for-all.

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Today’s Word of the Day is brouhaha which means, “a state of commotion or excitement.” Brouhaha is one of those words that always makes me giggle a little when I hear it. It almost sounds like it’s not a word, but rather a sound, like of like “pow” or “zoink.” I can at least say I’ve never been involved in a brouhaha, neither have I been involved in a kerfuffle, a fracas, a donnybrook, or a rumpus. All of those are similarly humorous words, and all of them mean basically the same thing — a fight. I’m a total weenie when it comes to physical confrontation. I think if I tried to throw a punch, I’d throw my shoulder out or something. Fat people shouldn’t fight anyway. It just looks embarrassing. I’ll just stand on the sidelines and shout insults at whoever the wrong party is.

Give the brush-off.

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Today’s Word of the Day is rebuff which means, “to reject or criticize sharply.” Ladies, what is the best way to deal with a guy who hits on you but can’t seem to take a hint? Like all people, I enjoy when people pay me a compliment or give me some attention, but sometimes the attention goes too far, or it becomes too uncomfortable, and you don’t want to be a bitch, but you also want to make sure whoever it is gets the hint. It’s something as a woman, I don’t think men realize they’re lucky to not have to deal with. Men don’t have to fear being too harsh with a woman and then having her come back and kill him or hurt him in some way. Women have to worry about that all the time. Whenever we reject a man, no matter how nicely we do it, there’s always that little fear in the back of our minds that he’s not going to take it well and retaliate in some way. A friend of mine turned down in a guy in a bar, and he walked away…then came back 10  minutes later and slapped her in the face, calling her a “frigid bitch.” All for not wanting to go back to his apartment with him. That’s our reality. Be grateful if it isn’t yours.

Just like glue.

Today’s Word of the Day is linchpin which means, “one that holds something together.” For my money, the best example of a linchpin (in music) that I can think of is George Harrison. The Beatles were not The Beatles without him, no matter how talented John, Paul, and Ringo were on their own. I think he’s criminally underrated, maybe not as much for his solo work, but for the work he did within the band. He was the quiet, driving force that kept everyone going, even if at the time, they didn’t realize it or appreciate it. So, for today’s Musical Interlude Friday, I give you my favorite Beatles song with George on lead vocals, one of the few songs in the band’s entire oeuvre you can say that about. Enjoy!

Welp, we got another new one.

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Today’s Word of the Day is acceptation which means, “a generally accepted meaning of a word.” Merriam-Webster ain’t playin’ lately. I thought I was well-read or at least somewhat knowledgeable about the English language, but then they go and drop some words that I’ve never heard of before. This is one of them. When I think of a word’s acceptation, I think of the meaning people use more often rather than the most official or most appropriate one. For example; I don’t know anyone who uses the word “bitch” to describe a female dog, even though that’s what a bitch is. If you’re an animal breeder you would use it that way, but for the rest of us, that’s not what a bitch is. A bitch is a horrid, obnoxious, or generally disagreeable woman. I know that doesn’t sound strictly like the definition of “acceptation,” but I’m doing my best to make sense here.

This one is a doozy.

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Today’s Word of the Day is tergiversation which means, “evasion of direct action or statement.” Whoo. What a word. I’m not even particularly sure where to go with this blog post because I’ve never heard this word before, and I’m not exactly sure how to go about talking about it. It’s arguably the fanciest-sounding word I’ve written about here, and whipping this one out at a party will certainly get people looking your way. Tergiversation almost sounds like it could be describing cowardice in some way, if you’re talking about refusing to say or do something when saying or doing something right that moment is essential. You know, you see someone bleeding in the street, and rather than try to render aid or call 911, you keep walking. That sounds like tergiversation to me. Does that make sense to anyone else or has one of Merriam-Webster’s Words of the Day finally bested me?

Tie one on.

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Today’s Word of the Day is crapulous which means, “sick from excessive drinking of alcohol.” Another way of saying that is “hungover,” which is a perfect word for Sunday morning given how many of you probably went out and had a good time Saturday night. I don’t drink, so I’ve never been drunk, therefore I have no idea what it’s like to be hungover. That said, I know what it’s like to be nauseated, and I know what it’s like to vomit, and neither of those things are very fun. Every now and again you see a news article about new and improved cure for hangovers, and I always start laughing as I read them. The only cure for a hangover is not getting drunk in the first place. No amount of greasy food, coffee, cold showers, or “hair of the dog” is going to stop you from feeing sick the next day. That’s your body telling you to knock that shit off. I’m not saying don’t drink, I’m saying don’t drink to excess. It’s a dumb thing to do anyway, and who wants to spend the next morning bent over praying to the porcelain god? Not this gal.

The soul of wit.

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I’d put that on my tombstone too, just to be a smartass about it.

Today’s Word of the Day is quip which means, “a clever or witty remark.” For my money, the all-time champion of the clapback is Dorothy Parker. Winston Churchill comes in a close second. It takes a lot of skill to dish it out properly, and Ms. Parker had that skill in spades. She’s my spirit animal. She was a member of the famed Algonquin Round Table, a collection of New York City writers, critics, actors, and wits. One of the games they used to play was called, “I Can Give You a Sentence,” wherein the person would be given a word, and they’d have to come up with a sentence that contained that word. Dorothy’s word was “horticulture” and she came up with the utterly sublime, “You can lead a horticulture, but you can’t make her think.” Another one of her famous quips was in response to The House on Pooh Corner by A.A. Milne. She wrote book reviews for The New Yorker under the byline “Constant Reader,” and this is what she had to say about a passage in said book —

“And it is that word ‘hummy,’ my darlings, that marks the first place in The House at Pooh Corner where Tonstant Weader fwowed up.”

I wish I was that witty. I really do. I usually think of a good comeback about a week after I should have delivered it. Such is the shame.

Hear ye, hear ye!

Today’s Word of the Day is emblazon which means, “to inscribe with heraldic bearings.” Now, I’ve most often heard this word used in the context of a t-shirt or a wall “emblazoned” with something, usually words or a logo or some kind of art piece, so not quite how Merriam-Webster says it should be used. Back in ye olden days of course, and by that I mean the Middle Ages, heraldry was a huge thing, and most noble families had their own coat of arms, each with specific meaning to either their family names or regions they came from. For example, Prince William’s coat of arms has three seashells on it, as the seashells come from the Spencer coat of arms, which was his late mother’s. Trying to find a good song to come up with today that ties in some how to it was difficult. As such, I had to think outside the box. For today’s Musical Interlude Friday I give you “Cover Me” by Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band. Enjoy!

The beat goes on. Or not.

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Today’s Word of the Day is Luddite which means, “someone opposed to technological change.” I’m pretty sure we all know at least one person like that, probably someone in our families, someone who for whatever reason just hasn’t gotten on board with the new, the hip, and the now. My sister likes to joke with me that I’m a Luddite because I don’t have a smartphone, but I don’t have one because I can’t afford one, not because I think iPhones or Androids are the devil. I want nothing more than to be able to buy a new phone, but $$$$$$$ is an issue. Now, if someone wanted to call me a Luddite because I prefer rotary dial phones to touch-tone phones, specifically for landlines, then I’d go along with that. I’ve always loved rotary dial phones, and you can get some really nice vintage pieces online that weigh a ton. They made things better back then, I think. I also love typewriters, but word processors are faster, easier, and if you make mistakes, they’re easier to correct.

What old-timey technology would you prefer to use over its current iteration?