This is me.

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Would you believe I’ve never been to the top of the Hancock Building? Just the Sears Tower. I refuse to call it by its corporate name…even though Sears is a corporate name too.

When people ask me where I’m from, I always say I have “North Carolina branches, Illinois roots.” I live just outside Winston-Salem, but I was born and raised in Chicago, and I’m inordinately proud of that fact. I love where I’m from, I love the neighborhood I grew up in, I love the people that surrounded me there. There are things about Chicago I’m not enamored with and that I wish would change, and hearing news report after news report about the violence staining the city breaks my heart in pieces every time, but it’s never enough to make me wish I’d come from somewhere else. It’s who I am. It informed the kind of person I grew up into. I lived in a very diverse neighborhood, went to diverse schools, found myself surrounded by people from all walks of life. It is probably why I’m so liberal and progressive as an adult. I don’t know that I would have ended up this way if I grew up in the South, where I currently live. I don’t think all Southerners are racist or backwards or ignorant, but I see enough of those things every day to know that it would have affected how I saw the world growing up.

Thank you great-grandparents (on both sides) for settling in Chicago. Thank you, thank you, thank you.

https://dailypost.wordpress.com/prompts/roots/

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3 comments

  1. Pursuing A Path · April 26

    The roots and branches concept is something I had not heard of. Chicago is a beautiful area! NC is somewhere I would love to visit, and hope to within the next few years. Thank you for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Anna · April 26

    I grew up in NC, and moved to New Orleans at 17. I’ve lived here ever since, with a 4-year stint spent in Chicago at one point (love Chicago, wouldn’t have moved if not for a man). Gotta say that I agree with you about it not being healthy to spend your formative years in a racist place. I was lucky to get out and have my views greatly widened by my new home(s) and lots of traveling, but it’s difficult for me to go home and find common ground with my family and old friends now. It’s very strange, being a city girl with a country heart, and not truly fitting in in either place.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Nice.

    Like

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